Climate Voices Science Speakers Network

What we do.

The Climate Voices network brings non-political conversations about the research findings of the majority of climate scientists to citizens across the United States and Puerto Rico. Scientists and other experts meet with neighbors and community organizations to initiate discussions about the local effects of a changing climate and possible ways to address impacts. Use the map to find a speaker near you and invite them to local meetings. Thank you for allowing Climate Voices to be part of your community!

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How it Works


1Search the database to find a speaker

The database is searchable by last name, geographic location, expertise, and languages spoken. Read through expert profiles to find the right person for your group.


2 Contact a Scientist

Contact the speaker directly by clicking on the contact tab at the end of their profile and issuing them an invitation. They will receive an email from you and should respond directly to you within 48 hours. (If you do not hear back within that time, feel free to contact our staff for assistance.)


3Logistics

Once you have connected, discuss logistics such as time, location, type (service organization, faith-based, etc.) and size of group being assembled. If you have special requests of the expert, such as information on a particular aspect of climate science or climate change, be sure to let them know. And remind them that you are expecting a conversation, not a technical talk. Discuss any equipment needs if they would like to give a brief presentation to set the context for discussion at your meeting.


4Follow up

If you would like to continue or expand the discussion beyond the allotted meeting time, do not hesitate to invite the expert to return for another visit. You may also contact other Climate Voices experts in your area for additional conversations.

How it Works


3Logistics

Once you have connected, discuss logistics such as time, location, type (service organization, faith-based, etc.) and size of group being assembled. If you have special requests of the expert, such as information on a particular aspect of climate science or climate change, be sure to let them know. And remind them that you are expecting a conversation, not a technical talk. Discuss any equipment needs if they would like to give a brief presentation to set the context for discussion at your meeting.


2 Contact a Scientist

Contact the speaker directly by clicking on the contact tab at the end of their profile and issuing them an invitation. They will receive an email from you and should respond directly to you within 48 hours. (If you do not hear back within that time, feel free to contact our staff for assistance.)


4Follow up

If you would like to continue or expand the discussion beyond the allotted meeting time, do not hesitate to invite the expert to return for another visit. You may also contact other Climate Voices experts in your area for additional conversations.

Start

Events

November 20, 2014

Transitions in America's Energy Use: Approaches to a Changing Climate from the Corporate to the Individual Learn more

Public audiences are often interested in how citizens, businesses and policymakers are responding to climate change and in what “solutions” they might participate as individuals. This webinar will cover historic changes that are now underway in America’s power sector—the largest source of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions—and how certain approaches can help accelerate the transition to a low-carbon energy economy. Jeff Deyette from the Union of Concerned Scientists will discuss several important issues facing the power industry including the eroding economics of coal, the risks of over reliance on natural gas, recent advances in renewable energy, and federal rules that limit carbon emissions. In addition, Mr. Deyette will highlight the most effective and current choices that individuals can make to lower their carbon footprint.

Jeff Deyette is assistant director of energy research for UCS and a co-author of “Cooler, Smarter: Practical Steps for Low-Carbon Living.” He conducts analysis on the economic and environmental costs and benefits of renewable energy and energy efficiency policies. He attained a master’s degree in energy resource and environmental management and international relations from Boston University.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

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December 14, 2014

Communicating Climate Science Workshop @ AGU Meeting Learn more

At this interactive workshop, climate scientists of all experience levels will learn how to communicate climate science basics to general audiences, especially during media interviews, including showing how their specific research connects to broader climate science. This workshop will focus on some of the trickier aspects of communicating climate science, including strategies for getting started, tips for engaging various audiences, and advice on avoiding potential pitfalls and dealing with difficult questions. Small group discussions and mock interviews will offer veteran communicators and novices alike the chance to practice creating and delivering messages about climate science.

Speakers include John Cook, a Climate Communication Research Fellow for the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland, and Aaron Huertas, a Science Communications Officer at the Union of Concerned Scientists.
Space is limited and advance application is required. The deadline to apply is Fri., Oct. 31

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Starts Aug. 28, 2014

Reading the IPCC Report (Seminar Series) Learn more

The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the University of Colorado’s Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences have assembled a distinguished group of IPCC authors and contributors for a fall seminar series on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I’s contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report). To see the list of speakers and the schedule, and to access those seminars being webcast (webinar access will be posted as it becomes available), see http://cires.colorado.edu/news/announcements/2014/IPCCseminar.html.

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